Tue. Mar 5th, 2024

Santa Ana voters have received their ballots, via U.S. Mail, for the upcoming March, 2024 primary election. This election features state and federal legislative candidates, judges, county supervisors and a state proposition.

Here is our Voter Guide for this election:

  • President – The main candidates are the incumbent, Pres. Joe Biden (D) and Donald Trump (R). Trump has one legitimate Republican opponent, Nikki Haley. His other opponents have dropped out of the race. Independent and third party voters have many choices including Cornel West (Peace and Freedom), James Bradley (American Independent), Jill Stein (Green), and Charles Ballay (Libertarian Party). Robert F. Kennedy, a former Democrat, apparently did not make the California Primary ballot. Our personal sentiment is that Biden and Trump are too old to serve and appear to be mentally unfit. Trump may also be convicted on criminal charges by the time the General Election rolls around.
  • U.S. Senator – the leading Democrat in this race is Adam Schiff. An Orange County legislator, Katie Porter, is also contending for this open seat. The leading Republican candidate, Dodger great Steve Garvey, is the onloy hope for the GOP.
  • U.S. House of Representatives – the incumbent, Lou Correa (D), is very popular and should win easily over his unknown Republican opponent, David Pan.
  • 68th Assembly District – the incumbent, Avelino Valencia (D), is tainted by the Anaheim corruption scandal as he previously served on the Anaheim City Council and was backed by the crooked Disney and Anaheim Chamber cabal. His only opponent, Mike Tardif (R), is a longtime resident of Santa Ana who has supported neighborhood organizations for years.
  • Judge of the O.C. Superior Court, Office 3Jason Baez is an O.C. District Attorney Prosecutor. His opponent, Dan Jacobson, is endorsed by a slew of Democrats. Guess which candidate is more likely to give harsh sentences to criminals?
  • Judge of the O.C. Superior Court, Office 16Binh Dang is an Deputy Public Defender in Los Angeles County, which means he is paid to defend criminals in court. His opponent, Richard Zimmer, is an O.C. District Attorney Prosecutor. Guess which candidate is more likely to give harsh sentences to criminals?
  • Judge of the O.C. Superior Court, Office 35 Whitney Bokosky is an O.C. District Attorney Prosecutor. Her opponent, Daniel Kern, is a family law attorney and he appears to be a Democrat. Guess which candidate is more likely to give harsh sentences to criminals?
  • Orange County Board of Education, Area One – Jorge Valdes (R), an attorney, is the incumbent. He is being challenged by Beatriz Mendoza (D). She currently lives in Santa Ana with her two children who attend local public schools, her oldest attends Santa Ana College. Valdes is more likely to support parental choice in education while Mendoza will likely support public education only.

There is also one state proposition to consider:

Prop. 1 – AUTHORIZES $6.38 BILLION IN BONDS TO BUILD MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT FACILITIES FOR THOSE WITH MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE CHALLENGES; PROVIDES HOUSING FOR THE HOMELESS. LEGISLATIVE STATUTE.

Argument Against Prop. 1 – Governor Newsom’s Proposition 1 is a nightmare for taxpayers, cities and counties, and people with mental illness.

Prop. 1 is so huge, expensive, and destructive, it’s already attracted a BIPARTISAN coalition of opponents.

Vote NO because:

PROP. 1 WILL COST TAXPAYERS MORE THAN $10 BILLION. Prop. 1 puts taxpayers on the hook for DECADES to pay back new bonds. This isn’t “free money!” It’s credit card borrowing from Wall Street. According to Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, bonds are the most expensive and inefficient way to pay for a government program. And with interest rates today, it’s a VERY BAD TIME to be taking on new bond debt, adding at least 60% IN INTEREST COSTS, costing taxpayers an estimated $10.58 – $12.45 billion. This will take decades to pay back. The State should have prioritized spending through the budget process when we had a $100 billion state budget surplus. Our children will be paying our debts, and their streets won’t be any cleaner for it.

PROP. 1 ISN’T A SOLUTION TO HOMELESSNESS. The State has failed at reducing California’s homelessness problem. Sacramento has already thrown $20 billion at the crisis in the last five years without making significant progress. The number of unhoused people increased 6% last year. The State Auditor’s Office is still trying to find where the billions went. We will indeed have more tents in our neighborhoods and fewer people in treatment if Prop. 1 passes.

If the state wants a grand solution for homelessness, it should attack the heart of the problem through the regular budget process–not expensive bond measures that RAISE TAXPAYER COSTS LONG-TERM. Californians are already some of the most over-taxed people in the country.

PROP. 1 CUTS SERVICES FOR THE MENTALLY ILL. In 2004, the voters passed Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), which dedicated funds for community-based mental health services. Prop. 1 STEALS AWAY almost 1/3 of that guaranteed annual funding from the “millionaire’s tax” leaving already underfunded programs to fight for the remaining money. That’s why CalVoices, California’s oldest mental health advocacy agency, opposes it.

PROP. 1 MANDATES STATE CONTROL OVER LOCAL CONTROL, WITH REDUCED OVERSIGHT. California’s 58 urban and rural counties all have different needs. Prop. 1 brings a one-size-fits-all program and puts a huge, unaccountable state agency in charge. The voter-approved MHSA was locally based, allowing counties to set their own priorities, with mandatory, independent oversight and accountability. Under Prop. 1, oversight and accountability are watered down, instead giving authority to the governor and his bureaucrats. This threatens effective programs that counties already offer.

Leave it to Sacramento to find a way to INCREASE COSTS, CUT VITAL PROGRAMS, and offer only UNPROVEN IDEAS! Far from being a magic solution, Prop. 1 is a multibillion dollar disaster that will hurt the very people it claims to help. And who’s left holding the bag when Prop. 1 fails? The taxpayers, once again.

THIS IS THE WRONG APPROACH. VOTE NO ON PROP. 1.

  • Senate Minority Leader Brian W. Jones
  • Assemblymember Diane B. Dixon
  • Heidi Strunk, CEO
  • Mental Health America of California

Please be sure to fill out and return your ballot promptly! If you don’t vote you have no right to complain about the results…

Voter Resources



By Editor

The New Santa Ana blog has been covering news, events and politics in Santa Ana since 2009.

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