Sat. Mar 2nd, 2024

The Anaheim Police Department arrested five armed robbery suspects last Sunday after a police pursuit that ended in a parking lot, as reported by NBC.

Police officers arrived at the scene of an alleged armed robbery and tried to pull over a sedan they felt was linked to the robbery. The driver refused to yield, leading the officers on a pursuit that included strip mall parking lots and residential neighborhoods.

A resident in Anaheim actually kicked the passenger-side door of the car as it passed through their neighborhood. Most likely the resident took umbrage at their speed.

The driver eventually stopped the car at a parking lot near the intersection of Euclid Street and Ball Road in Anaheim. The five suspects slowly exited the vehicle and crawled toward officers one by one as they were instructed. The chase was over.

The Anaheim Police investigators have not yet divulged any details on the alleged robbery.

The names of the individuals arrested were not released and any charges that might be pending are not known at this time.

first degree robbery conviction is punishable by 3, 4 or 6 years in state prison. If you and at least two other individuals act in concert to commit the robbery within an inhabited dwelling house or building, a first degree robbery conviction is punishable by 3, 6 or 9 years in state prison, according to the Law Firm of Wallin & Klarich, in Tustin.

There are also other factors that can increase your sentence beyond this range. These include but are not limited to:

  • Great bodily injury: If you cause another person to suffer great bodily injury duringIf a firearm was involved in the robbery, your sentence will likely be enhanced.the commission of a robbery, you can be sentenced to an additional and consecutive term of 3 to 6 years in state prison.
  • Use of a firearm: If you use a firearm during the commission of a robbery, you can be sentenced to an additional and consecutive term of 10 years in state prison
  • Discharge of a firearm: If you personally and intentionally discharge a firearm during the commission of a robbery, you can be sentenced to an additional and consecutive term of 20 years in state prison
  • Discharge of a firearm resulting in great bodily injury or death: If you personally and intentionally discharge a firearm during the commission of a robbery, causing great bodily injury or death to another, you can be sentenced to an additional and consecutive term of 25 years to life in state prison

Under California law, it is illegal to flee from police if they are pursuing you. California Vehicle Code Section 2800.1 says that if you willfully flee or try to evade a pursuing police officer while driving a vehicle, you may be charged with the crime of evading a police officer, according to the Law Firm of Wallin & Klarich, in Tustin.

Crimes Related To Evading A Police Officer

Resisting Arrest – PC 148(A)(1)

Under California Penal Code 148(a)(1), it is unlawful to resist, delay, or otherwise obstruct a law enforcement officer or emergency medical technician from performing his or her duties. This is similar to evading a police officer because if you flee from the officer on foot or by use of any other means of transportation other than a motor vehicle, you can be charged with resisting arrest.

Resisting arrest is a misdemeanor crime in California. If you are convicted of resisting arrest under California Penal Code 148(a)(1), you face up to 364 days in county jail, a maximum $1,000 fine, or both jail and fine.

Reckless Evading A Police Officer – VC 2800.2

Under California Vehicle Code 2800.2, it is unlawful to willfully flee or try to evade a pursuing police officer while driving a vehicle with wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.

Reckless evading a police officer can be charged as a misdemeanor or felony in California. If you are convicted of misdemeanor reckless evading a peace officer under California Vehicle Code 2800.2, you face six months to 364 days in county jail, a maximum fine of $1,000, or both jail and fine. If convicted of felony reckless evading a police officer, you face up to 16 months, two or three years in state  prison, a maximum fine of $10,000, or both prison and fine.

Evading A Police Officer Causing Injury Or Death – VC 2800.3

Under California Vehicle Code 2800.3, it is unlawful to willfully flee or try to evade a pursuing police officer while driving a vehicle, causing serious bodily injury or death of another.

Evading a police officer causing injury or death can result be charged as a misdemeanor or felony in California. If you are convicted of misdemeanor evading a peace officer causing injury or death, you face up to 364 days in county jail, a fine of $2,000 to $10,000, or both jail and fine. If convicted of felony evading a peace officer causing injury, you face three, five or seven years in state prison, a fine of $2,000 to $10,000, or both prison and fine.



By Editor

The New Santa Ana blog has been covering news, events and politics in Santa Ana since 2009.

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